Only woman in SEAL training pipeline drops out, Navy says

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"No women have entered the full training pipeline just yet", a Navy official who declined to be identified told Task & Purpose.

The female midshipman voluntarily chose to not continue participating in a summer course that's required of officers who want to be selected for SEAL training, Lt. Cmdr. Mark Walton told CNN in June. It's not the same program as the more rigorous Navy SEAL pipeline.

They often support the SEALs but also conduct missions of their own using state-of-the art, high-performance boats. If they do, the next step is review by a SEAL officer selection panel.

According to CBS News, the officer got through half of her three weeks of pre-training before BUD/S before choosing to quit.

The first female officer candidate, alongside two female Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewman program entrants, represented a significant milestone for a service branch that had, until the 2015 Pentagon guidance, excluded women from the SEALs and SWCC community.

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The midshipman, who was identified by Military.com in July as a ROTC junior at an unnamed US college, was the first female to enter the elite SEAL Officer Assessment and Selection (SOAS) program since Ashton Carter announced the Department of Defense (DoD) was lifting restrictions on female applicants for combat and special operations roles in 2016.

That decision was formal recognition of the thousands of female servicewomen who fought in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars in recent years, including those who were killed or wounded.

The program is the first in-person evaluation of a candidate who desires to become a Navy SEAL officer, and it allows sailors to compete against peers in an equitable training environment.

According to the AP, the three-week program in Coronado, California, tests physical and psychological strength, water competency and leadership skills. But even then about 10 percent of military jobs remained closed to women. For example, 18 other women were accepted to the first phase of Army Ranger training with Griest and Have.

That basic training, which lasts six months, is so arduous that 75 percent of candidates drop out by the end of the first month. But her story is far from unique since all combat roles became open to women in the military.

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