Theresa May's election gamble backfires as voters throw a surprise

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Now the tone of those Brexit talks, set to start in just 10 days - and even May's own position - are up in the air.

May's gamble that she could capitalise on Britons' desire to quit the European Union and perceived weakness in the opposition Labour Party backfired on Thursday as voters stripped her of her parliamentary majority.

May's Conservative Party won 318 seats in the 650-seat House of Commons compared to 330 seats in 2015. The Scottish National Party is projected to win 34 seats, the Liberal Democrats 14 seats, and other parties 22 seats. European officials are anxious that the weaker position of the Conservatives make a breakdown in negotiations more likely.

The DUP itself said only that it would enter talks and it was not immediately clear what its demands might be.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has said she would take time to "reflect" on how to move forward after a surprise snap election result left the Conservative Party without a majority in the Parliament.

Trump, who was answering a shouted question from a reporter during an Oval Office photo opportunity, did not expand on his comment.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had given the party "confidence" about selling party policies such as public ownership of the railways, she added. May called the snap vote in a bid to strengthen her mandate ahead of exit talks with the European Union.

An admirer of Karl Marx and Hugo Chavez, Mr. Corbyn is arguably the most radical left-wing party leader in British electoral history. The BBC reports that the Tories lost 12, while Labour-the party of Corbyn-gained 29. May said she'd be willing to get rid of some human rights laws to better combat terrorism, but it seems voters didn't give into their fear as much as anticipated and agreed with Labour's stance that defeating terrorism can't come from "ripping up our basic rights and our democracy".

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Trump kept up his criticism of the investigations in a series of tweets on Friday. Moscow has denied any interference and the White House has denied any collusion.

On Twitter, Siegfried Muresan, spokesman for the European Parliament's largest grouping, the European People's Party, said, "EU did not want #Brexit, but has been prepared to negotiate it since previous year". "I'm afraid we ran a pretty awful campaign", she said.

Predictions of Conservative success became more modest as the party's campaign faltered following a series of missteps.

Instead of improving the Conservative hold on the House, she weakened it to the point that it will only take four dissidents from the coalition membership to topple the government.

People demonstrate on Whitehall, central London, Saturday June 10, 2017, after the British general election result.

The Tory loss has been attributed primarily to a weak campaign by Theresa May and her overconfidence.

"I don't think Theresa May and this government have any credibility". It does not care about domestic United Kingdom politics, save to the extent that it would prefer a strong and stable government that will not be overruled by its parliament, or overly influenced by other stakeholders who do not like the compromises that are required to be made.

Leading Brexit campaigner Nigel Farage said the result had put the whole future of Brexit at risk.

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